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Cement Finishers and Mesothelioma

Cement mixer machines

Cement finishers who mixed, spread and polished concrete routinely inhaled asbestos fibers that were released into the air – which increased their risk of developing mesothelioma. Asbestos was commonly used in cement and concrete products over the past century to construct homes, office buildings and other structures such as fireplaces and boilers.

How Were Cement Finishers Exposed to Asbestos?

For many years, cement finishers may have unknowingly breathed dust containing cancer-causing asbestos when working with concrete products.  In most situations, cement finishers worked directly with the product by mixing it by hand.  Many cement-finishers also likely had cement on their body, in their hair and on their clothing which when dried increased the risk of them and their families being exposed to asbestos as well.

Are Cement Finishers Still At Risk of Exposure to Asbestos?

Yes.  Many older buildings and structures have asbestos-containing materials.  Workers involved in the demolition, remodeling or maintenance of an area where asbestos was once used are at a significantly increased risk of contracting mesothelioma and other asbestos-related diseases.

According to a study released by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), older concrete has shown high concentrations of asbestos.

Cement finishers are often called upon to fix or remove damage or chipped concrete that was manufactured many years ago.  Asbestos fibers released during a renovation or demolition process can be inhaled and lead to mesothelioma.

Why Are Cement Finishers Still At Risk of Getting Mesothelioma?

Cement finishers who were exposed to asbestos dust in the past remain at risk of developing mesothelioma. The aggressive cancer has a latency period of up to 60 years before symptoms appear. You may only recently have begun experiencing symptoms of respiratory disease and been diagnosed with malignant mesothelioma.