Although cases of tongue metastasis are rare, researchers recently found a case wherein a 68-year-old Chinese man was diagnosed with malignant pleural mesothelioma in conjunction with a tongue lesion that was discovered to be a rare form of metastatic malignant mesothelioma. While malignant pleural mesothelioma is normally found in the lung, heart, chest wall, and vertebrae, finding metastatic forms of malignant pleural mesothelioma in the mouth and tongue can happen.

In this case, a 68-year-old man had a firm, submucosal mass found in the posterior portion of his tongue. A CT scan revealed a bilateral pleural effusion with pleural thickening and a low-density nodule in his right sublingual gland. A cytological examination of the pleural effusion fluid revealed features resembling mesothelioma.

Case studies revealed that oral metastases could be the first sign of an undiscovered primary malignancy in 23% of patients, but tongue metastasis from mesothelioma only accounts for <3% of all oral metastatic malignancies.

Patients diagnosed with malignant mesothelioma are encouraged to speak with their oncologist or consult with a Mesothelioma Center of Excellence to determine effective treatments or whether they may be a candidate for a clinical trial. We at MesotheliomaHelp.org are available to assist you in locating treatment centers.

For more information about this study, please reach out to us today.